What did the Supreme Court decide on the Affordable Care Act?

What did the Supreme Court decide on the Affordable Care Act?

Texas regarding the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), rejecting the third major challenge to the law. The Supreme Court held in a 7–2 opinion that the states and individuals that brought the lawsuit challenging the ACA’s individual mandate do not have standing to challenge the law.

What did the Supreme Court hold in the recent case of California v Texas?

In a 7-2 decision in California v. Texas, the Court held that several Republican-led states and private individuals who had sought to strike down the ACA in its entirety lacked standing to bring the challenge in the first place.

Is it cheaper to live in Texas or California?

California is one of the most expensive states to live in. Texas is more affordable, almost across the board.

Will the Obamacare Supreme Court ruling be the last?

The ObamaCare supreme court ruling has kept ObamaCare (mostly) intact for now. The law still stands, but time will be the test. If the Affordable Care Act goes to the supreme court again, the next ruling on ObamaCare could be it’s last.

Is Obamacare health insurance subsidized by employers?

Although Obamacare health insurance is subsidized for most enrollees, it’s not likely to be subsidized for you. If you’re offered health insurance by your employer, you’re not eligible for an Obamacare subsidy unless the health insurance your employer offers is exceptionally lousy or unaffordable.

Is Obamacare still in effect?

The good news is that ObamaCare (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act), which passed in 2010, remains the law (albeit with some modifications). However, during the ObamaCare Supreme Court ruling, some important aspects of the health care bill were lost.

Do I qualify for an Obamacare subsidy if I have health insurance?

If you’re offered health insurance by your employer, you’re not eligible for an Obamacare subsidy unless the health insurance your employer offers is exceptionally lousy or unaffordable. In this instance, exceptionally lousy means your job-based health plan has an actuarial value of less than 60%.

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